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Česká stopa v RSGB

• 24. liestopadu 2014

Kolegové z britské RSGB si ustavili pracovní skupinu pro mládež. Máme takovou už nějaký ten pátek, takže to umíme ocenit. Ještě víc nás pak těší, že tuto informaci ilustrovali obrázkem českého týmu z letošního YOTA 2014 ve Finsku

Oficiální dokumenty pro zasedání IARU R1 ve Varně

• 23. června 2014

Na tomto odkaze naleznete oficiální dokumenty pro letošní zasedání IARU REGION 1 v Bulahrské Varně.

 

IARU E-LETTER

• 4. březen 2013

IARU E-LETTER
The International Amateur Radio Union
IARU Electronic Newsletter
1 March 2013

In this Issue:
World Amateur Radio Day 2013
IARU Michael J. Owen VK3KI Award
UK Amateurs Gain Increased Access to 5 MHz

World Amateur Radio Day 2013

Each year the IARU Administrative Council selects a theme for World Amateur Radio Day (WARD) for the following year. WARD takes place each year on April 18. At the November, 2012 Administrative Council meeting the AC adopted the following proposal: "The theme 'Amateur Radio: Entering Its Second Century of Disaster Communications' was adopted for the next World Amateur Radio Day, April 18, 2013."

The selected theme for 2013 is a excellent opportunity for amateur radio emergency communications or disaster communications groups to take advantage of the WARD to highlight the role amateur radio plays in disaster communications and disaster response. IARU member-societies could arrange amateur radio demonstrations in public places such as parks or shopping areas. Prepared handouts could explain the benefits of amateur radio in times of emergency or disaster. A ham radio demonstration in public areas usually generates inquiries and questions from the public about amateur radio and it also provides a great opportunity to attract new ham radio operators. If you plan on such a demonstration, don't forget to include some young people from your society so that young people who happen by the demonstration can see that amateur radio activity can be enjoyed by people of all ages.

In 2013, April 18 is a weekday. However, that doesn't prevent the public activity from taking place on the weekend before or after April 18. The idea is to gain as much exposure and publicity for amateur radio as possible.

Emergency communications groups might also combine a public demonstration for WARD with a simulated emergency test (SET).

WARD also provides an opportunity for amateurs to give presentations about ham radio to such groups as civic organizations, charitable groups, etc. For example, Rotary Clubs and Lions Clubs are only two of many worldwide organizations who have weekly meetings and these organizations are always looking for interesting and informative programs to present to their membership. There are very few experienced hams who can't talk for 15 or 20 minutes about ham radio in a positive fashion. Don't make the talk too technical. Stress the fun aspects of ham radio and the opportunity to assist in times of disaster. Keep the presentation to about 20 minutes to allow time for questions.

The fact that World Amateur Radio Day only happens one day each year shouldn't prevent IARU member-societies from promoting ham radio all during the year of course. Some member-society officials have expressed concern about a decrease in the number of new amateurs entering ham radio in their country. Upon further examination and discussion, it turns out there are many activities that societies could be involved in to increase public exposure to amateur radio but many are not taking advantage of those opportunities. WARD provides an opportunity to get out and make the effort to show the public what ham radio is about.

And, if your member-society is involved in promoting amateur radio on a regular basis and it has been a success, let me know. I will publicize the activity in this newsletter so that other member-societies can benefit from activities that have attracted people to amateur radio.

IARU Michael J. Owen VK3KI Award

The IARU Administrative Council created the IARU Michael J. Owen VK3KI Award in November, 2012. The Administrative Council Summary Record states: "10.13. The AC created the IARU Michael J. Owen VK3KI Award. A recipient of the award will be named from time to time and the award will be restricted to those individuals who perform above and beyond their volunteer roles either for a specific task or for long standing involvement on behalf of IARU. Nominations for this award should be directed to the IARU Secretary and will be forwarded to the AC for consideration at an AC meeting."

Michael was the President of the Wireless Institute of Australia at the time of his death in September, 2012. He started his involvement in IARU affairs in mid 1970's as a member of the newly formed IARU Region 3 Association, an organization of IARU member-societies in the Asia-Pacific region. He was involved in WARC 1979 when amateur radio gained bands at 10, 18 and 24 MHz. He was heavily involved in WRC 2003 and the Article 25 re-write which contain the rules that apply specifically to the amateur and amateur-satellite services. From 1989-1999, Michael served as IARU Vice President. After stepping down as IARU VP, he became involved in WIA and had an important role in transitioning the WIA from a confederation to a national amateur radio society. He then turned his attention once again to IARU Region 3 and served as Chairman of IARU Region 3 since 2006 until the time of his death.

Michael's enthusiasm and experience was beneficial to all of the IARU member-societies and his passion for amateur radio will remembered well by those who had the good fortune to know Michael.

If you know an any deserving individual who has contributed time and effort to the IARU and the IARU member-societies, please send along the information about the person to me as IARU Secretary and the individual will be considered for the award by the Administrative Council.

Amateur Access to 5 MHz for UK Hams

After 1 January 2013, UK amateurs who hold a "full" license have been allowed to apply to operate on frequencies within the 5 MHz band. Following a request from the Radio Society of Great Britain for increased access to the 5 MHz (Experimental) Band, Ofcom (the UK independent telecom regulator) secured the agreement of the primary user to increase spectrum access from the current 7 spot frequencies of 3 kHz each. Details of the change can be found at http://www.rsgb.org/committees/spectrumforum/5mhz.php Congratulations to the RSGB for their effort to gain additional access to 5MHz. Let's hope this news encourages some of the other IARU member-societies to approach their telecom authority with a request for access to the 5 MHz if they currently have no operating privileges in that band. (Credit: RadCom, March 2013 issue and RSGB)

73, Rod W6ROD

Distribution Of This E-Letter

This electronic newsletter is sent to many IARU member-societies headquarters around the world. Individual amateurs should encourage their IARU national society to forward the newsletter to its own members. The newsletter can also be read and downloaded from the IARU web site at www.iaru.org.

If you are an ARRL member, you can subscribe to this E-Letter directly on the ARRL web site. When you log into the ARRL web site, go to the page where you can edit your profile and choose the electronic newsletter options that are available.

If you have any information that would be appropriate to publish in this electronic newsletter, please contact me at w6rod@iaru.org.

Rod Stafford W6ROD
IARU Secretary

The IARU E-Letter is published on behalf of the Administrative Council of the International Amateur Radio Union by the IARU International Secretariat. Editor: Rod Stafford, W6ROD, IARU Secretary. Material from The IARU E-Letter may be republished or reproduced in whole or in part in any form without additional permission. Credit must be given to The IARU E-Letter and The International Amateur Radio Union.

Problémy LoTW

• 7. listopad 2012

ARRL přiznala, že má problém s LoTW. Osobně jsem jej objevil již před více než měsícem a korespondoval o tom s N1TA. Ne vše pracuje, jak má.

 

Miloš, OK1MP

 

Yes the ARRL is visibly "having a problem with the Logbook system and are presently working to restore Logbook service" says K1MK, Mike Keane, ARRL IT Manager. But despite what one DX source is reporting "no data has been lost in this incident".

Jak dále s IRC?

• 6. listopad 2012

Některé země ruší prodej IRC - viz přiložená informace. Je to předzvěst jejich zániku a nahrazení zasílání peněz? Na druhé straně do zemí jako Rusko nebo i Indonésie se nedoporučuje zasílání "Green Spamps". Ty se z dopisů vypařují!

 

Miloš, OK1MP

 

Last month the United States Postal Service (USPS) "filed a notice of mailing services price adjustments with the Postal Regulatory Commission (PRC), effective on January 27, 2013. One of the USPS proposals is to discontinue the sale of International Reply Coupons (IRCs) due to the "low quantity demand by customers" but continue to redeem "purchased in foreign countries". You can read more in the Federal Register at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2012/10/23/2012-25992/internati... -mailing-services-proposed-product-and-price-changes#h-13. G3SWH, Phil, reminds everyone that the United Kingdom has already stopped selling IRCs as you can see at http://www.g3swh.org.uk/irc.html .

IARU e-Letter

• 15. září 2012

IARU E-LETTER
The International Amateur Radio Union
IARU Electronic Newsletter
15 September 2012

In this Issue:

WRC-12: A Review and A Look Ahead to WRC-15

WRC-12 (World Radiocommunication Conference 2012) is history and with the passage of several months it is appropriate to look back at the results achieved for and on behalf of amateur radio worldwide and to look ahead at what WRC-15 has in store for amateur radio.

Agenda Item 1.23. An important amateur radio agenda item for WRC-12 was "to consider an allocation of about 15 kHz in parts of the band 415-526.5 kHz to the amateur service on a secondary basis, taking into account the need to protect existing services."

In 2007, when the agenda items were tentatively set for WRC-12 and later when they were finalized by the ITU Council, there seemed to be much resistance to such an allocation by other radio spectrum users. All through the many preparatory meetings leading up to WRC-12 the resistance remained more or less steadfast. There were a number of administrations who were determined to oppose an amateur allocation in order to protect aeronautical navigation operating within the band in question.

However, as WRC-12 began there were a sizable number of administrations who were in favor of granting an amateur allocation in the band and there were 3 methods proposed to "satisfy" the agenda item. Two of the proposals provided for a secondary allocation and the third was NOC, or No Change.

At the end of the first week of the WRC, little progress within the sub-working group (SWG 4C3) dealing with the agenda item seemed to have been made on arriving at a solution to the conflicting points of view of granting an allocation and No Change. A drafting group was formed with the idea of consolidating the proposals in favor of an allocation and at the same time trying to accommodate some of the concerns of the administrations in favor of NOC. A compromise draft proposal for a secondary allocation at 472-479 kHz with footnote provisions to protect existing services resulted in a few of the NOC administrations approving the compromise. Not all of the NOC administrations changed their view however and the output of the sub-working group produced 2 options: a secondary amateur allocation at 472-479 kHz in a large portion of the world with EIRP limit of 5 watts and further limited to 1 watt within 800 km of specified countries (Option 1) and the still present NOC (Option 2).

Discussions within Working Group 4C failed to resolve the divergent views and the 2 options moved to the next higher level, Working Group 4. Owing to the effective and strong leadership skills of the WG 4 Chairman, Option 1 was adopted by WG 4 and was passed on to the Plenary for 2 mandatory readings before adoption. Option 1 ultimately passed through the required 2 readings and was declared adopted.

So as a result of the Final Acts of WRC-12, amateur radio has a new secondary allocation as set out in Option 1 above. The new allocation becomes effective on January 1, 2013 but amateurs will have to await action by their own national telecommunication authorities to establish when access will be given to the band.

There was another agenda item that could have had a negative impact or effect on amateur radio worldwide depending on how the WRC decided the issue. WRC-12 Agenda Item 1.15 was "to consider possible allocations in the range 3-50 MHz to the radiolocation service for oceanographic radar applications."

Quite a lot of preparatory work had been done in ITU-R WP5A over the last 4+ years to prove that HF radars are not compatible with operations of the amateur radio service. As a consequence, no proposals were approved at WRC to place the oceanographic radar into any of the amateur radio bands. Proposals for radiolocation services in the 5250-5450 kHz portion of the bands was finally squeezed into 5250-5275 kHz.

WRC-12 was a very successful WRC from the amateur radio perspective. Within 45 days, the IARU Administrative Council will meet and will address the WRC-15 agenda items with an eye to building the best strategy to deal with those agenda items in a way most favorable to amateur radio worldwide.

WRC-15 Agenda Item 1.4 is "to consider possible new allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis with the band 5250-5450 kHz in accordance with Resolution 649 (WRC-12)." A great deal of IARU time and effort will obviously be expended in support achieving this agenda item.

With seemingly everyone around the world gaining some degree of broadband access, the search for radio spectrum to satisfy the needs for mobile connectivity will become even more intense as we draw closer to WRC-15. Agenda Item 1.1 is "to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis and identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications, in accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12)." National telecommunication authorities around the world and the ITU are in search of spectrum to fill these mobile connectivity requirements. As this agenda item develops, the IARU will be there to maintain the amateur radio spectrum.

Other WRC-15 Agenda Items the IARU will be closely monitoring include the following:

AI 1.6.1: "to consider possible additional primary allocations to the fixed satellite service (Earth-to-space and space-to-Earth) of 250 MHz in the range between 10 GHz and 17 GHz in Region 1."

AI 1.10: "to consider spectrum requirements and possible additional spectrum allocations for the mobile-satellite service in the Earth-to-space and space-to-Earth directions, including the satellite component for broadband applications, including International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT), within the frequency range from 22 GHz to 26 GHz, in accordance with Resolution 234 (WRC-12)."

AI 1.18: "to consider a primary allocation to the radiolocation service for automotive applications in the 77.5-78.0 GHz frequency band in accordance with Resolution 654 (WRC-12)."

A lot of radio amateurs are aware of the increasing use of amateur spectrum by small satellites, mainly by universities. It is becoming an increasingly difficult situation to accommodate the number of small, non-commercial satellites within the amateur bands. These education based satellites do not really fit within the definition of the amateur service but have been accommodated there. These small satellites are categorized as nanosatellites (between 1 and 10 kg) and picosatellites (less than 1 kg). The ITU is trying to deal with this issue in an orderly manner and a "preliminary" WRC-18 agenda item is to consider whether these satellite operations can be accommodated in an already crowded radio spectrum.

As these issues develop, the IARU will keep Member-Societies aware of developments and how the Member-Societies can assist for the benefit of amateur radio.

Distribution Of This E-Letter

This electronic newsletter is sent to many IARU member-societies headquarters around the world. Individual amateurs should encourage their IARU national society to forward the newsletter to its own members. The newsletter can also be read and downloaded from the IARU web site at www.iaru.org.

If you are an ARRL member, you can subscribe to this E-Letter directly on the ARRL web site. When you log into the ARRL web site, go to the page where you can edit your profile and choose the electronic newsletter options that are available.

If you have any information that would be appropriate to publish in this electronic newsletter, please contact me at w6rod@iaru.org.

Rod Stafford W6ROD
IARU Secretary

The IARU E-Letter is published on behalf of the Administrative Council of the International Amateur Radio Union by the IARU International Secretariat. Editor: Rod Stafford, W6ROD, IARU Secretary. Material from The IARU E-Letter may be republished or reproduced in whole or in part in any form without additional permission. Credit must be given to The IARU E-Letter and The International Amateur Radio Union.

Světový radioamatérský den 2012

• 24. únor 2012

18. dubna proběhne již 87. Světový radioamatérský den. Letos pod názvem "Radioamatérské družice: Oslava 50-ti let ve vesmíru". Při té příležitosti připravuje řada organizací množství aktivit.

Miloš, OK1MP

 

On April 18, 2012 Amateur Radio operators around the world will be celebrating the anniversary of the 87th World Amateur Radio Day, founded by the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU). This year's theme for the World Amateur Radio Day is "Amateur Radio Satellites: Celebrating 50 Years in Space" in remembrance of the launching of OSCAR 1 (December 12, 1961) and OSCAR 2 (June 2, 1962).

This year members of the Grupo DXXE will activate special event station 6H6IARU from April 13 to 18. Activity will be on all bands from 160 to 6 meters and of course Amateur Radio satellites from different Grid Locators throughout Mexico. QSOs with this station are valid for the IARU Region 2 award, the various FMRE awards and the DXXE award (http://www.dxxe.org/).

QSL via N7RO and LoTW.

Jak hodnotí WRC-12 K1ZZ

• 24. únor 2012

Zde je zhodnocení WRC-12 od K1ZZ.

 

Miloš, OK1MP

 

I have been asked to provide a version of my reflections that can be distributed outside the IARU WRC team. Some of my observations in the version I circulated earlier today might be misinterpreted and are not really appropriate for broader dissemination. Thanks in advance for your understanding.

73,
Dave K1ZZ

 

Reflections on WRC-12

 

I returned home yesterday evening after a most memorable and successful 33 days in Geneva for the 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference and the first Conference Preparatory Meeting for WRC-15. It will be a while before I can put together a comprehensive report and a QST article, but I wanted to express the following thoughts before descending into the accumulation of work back here in Newington.

In my tenure as an ARRL staff member involved in the International Amateur Radio Union since 1972, the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference will always stand out as an extraordinary success. We still sometimes hear 10, 18 and 24 MHz referred to as "the WARC bands" even though 30 years have passed. The 2003 WRC ranks second because we managed something that had never done before: to move HF broadcasting out of 100 kHz of spectrum and thereby greatly improve the usefulness of the 40 meter band.

No single WRC-12 achievement may match these, but there were so many highlights of this year's conference that it is difficult to decide which of them was the greatest:

  • Joe Taylor, K1JT's speech to the Plenary at the end of the second week of the conference with an outstanding introduction by ITU Secretary-General Dr. Hamadoun Touré, HB9EHT
  • The celebration of the 50th anniversary of the International Amateur Radio Club, 4U1ITU, in the magnificent Popov Room in the ITU Tower attended by past and present Secretaries General and Radiocommunication Bureau Directors
  • Our fending off HF oceanographic radars from being in or even adjacent to amateur bands
  • The new allocation at 472 kHz
  • An agenda item for WRC-15 to consider a possible secondary allocation to the amateur service in parts of the 5250-5450 kHz band
  • Successful handling of a potentially difficult future agenda item concerning pico- and nano-satellites (this topic is too complex to go into detail here, but it is an important one)

There were even some Amateur Radio accomplishments during the WRC, including:

  • The first 1296 MHz EME QSOs from 4U1ITU using K1JT's software, with K1JT himself at the controls
  • More than 13,600 QSOs made from 4U1WRC
  • More than 3,500 QSOs made during the ARRL CW DX Contest from 4U1ITU

Amateur Radio is just a small part of the world's telecommunication community and is commercially insignificant compared to the satellite and mobile broadband interests. Yet, we have achieved a position within the International Telecommunication Union as a respected radio service. This position was not attained overnight or through the efforts of a single individual or small group. It was achieved through the shared passion and sense of purpose of an extraordinary band of people from many countries and diverse backgrounds, some with IARU titles and many not, nearly all of them volunteers, who have worked through the IARU over the decades to present a highly professional visage and to ensure that the participation on behalf of the amateur and amateur-satellite services is of a quality that is equal to that of any other radio service, and better than some.

I can't begin to tell you how proud I am to be a part of this team.

73,

David Sumner, K1ZZ
Chief Executive Officer, ARRL
IARU International Secretariat

23 February 2012

Malyj Vysotskyj končí jako platná země DXCC

• 24. únor 2012

Jak již bylo oznámeno dříve, 17. února skončila dohoda mezi Ruskem a Finskem, na základě které byl ostrov Malyj Vysotskij zařazen do seznamu zemí DXCC. Nová dohoda tento ostrov nezahrnuje. ARRL tuto změnu promítne po zpracování všech žádostí za rok 2011.

 

Miloš, OK1MP

 

Malyj Vysotskij Island Added to DXCC Deleted Entities List

According to the Finnish Ministry of Transportation and Communication, the Saimaa Canal Treaty between Finland and Russia has been finalized by relevant Finnish and Russian authorities through ratification.

The Treaty has entered into effect with a date of February 17, 2012.

Malyj Vysotskij Island (MVI), R1M, is no longer included in the Treaty.

Thus, MVI will be deleted from the DXCC list as of February 17, 2012, and added to the Deleted Entities List.

Administratively at HQ, we will not make the necessary changes to the DXCC system until after the final data processing for 2011 is complete -- this includes the tables shown in Logbook of The World.

DXCC members will see their current entity totals drop by one on their Mixed awards, and on the bands and modes where MVI credit is given. They will also see their DXCC Challenge totals drop commensurately.

Prefixy pro Jižní Súdán

• 24. únor 2012

ITU přidělila Jižnímu Súdánu sérii značek Z8A - Z8Z.

 

Miloš, OK1MP

 

Rezoluce COM6/12

• 16. únor 2012

V nočních hodinách byla přijata následující rezoluce.

Miloš, OK1MP

Resolution COM6/12 (WRC 12)

Possible allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis at around 5 300 kHz

The World Radiocommunication Conference (Geneva, 2012),

considering

  1. that amateur stations are regularly used for emergency radiocommunications in the event of hurricanes, typhoons, floods, fires, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and other disaster situations;
  2. that Recommendation ITU R M.1042 3, on disaster communications in the amateur and amateur-satellite services, encourages the development of such services capable of providing radiocommunications in the event of natural disasters, and recommends that their networks be robust, flexible and independent of other telecommunication services and capable of operating from emergency power;
  3. that communications in the HF bands allocated to the amateur service play a major role in work to mitigate catastrophes and in the delivery of communications in support of relief operations in areas where the telecommunication infrastructure is weak or has collapsed;
  4. that the various frequency bands allocated to the amateur service are contained in the Table of Frequency Allocations in Article 5 of the Radio Regulations,

recognizing

  1. that radiocommunication in the HF bands is dependent on propagation factors, with the result that frequencies in different bands have to be used to maintain stable communication for a relatively sustained period of time, with frequency changes in the case of communications with different correspondents located at very different distances;
  2. that it is essential that, in all cases, the maximum usable frequency (MUF) should not be excessively far from the next band allocated to the amateur service, so as to permit the setting up of communications in this band using typical amateur service antennas and power levels;
  3. that, in the current allocations to the amateur service in the HF bands, there is a significant jump, which causes many problems in terms of communication when the MUF falls below 7 MHz and the lowest usable frequency (LUF) is above 4 MHz, with the result that amateur stations would need to be able to access spectrum at around 5 MHz in order to fulfil their communication functions, particularly when they are engaged in providing emergency communications in response to disaster situations,

noting

  1. that the band 5 250-5 450 kHz is allocated to the fixed and mobile services, except aeronautical mobile, on a primary basis;
  2. that an allocation of an appropriate amount of spectrum, not necessarily contiguous, to the amateur service at around 5 300 kHz would be adequate to better satisfy its needs associated with use for providing communications in disaster situations and during relief operations;
  3. that the band 10 100-10 150 kHz is already allocated to the fixed service on a primary basis and to the amateur service on a secondary basis, and that effective use of both services has been possible,

resolves to invite WRC 15

to consider, based on the results of the ITU R studies referred to in invites ITU R below, the possibility of making an allocation of an appropriate amount of spectrum, not necessarily contiguous, to the amateur service on a secondary basis within the band 5 250-5 450 kHz,

invites ITU R

  1. to study spectrum requirements for a secondary allocation to the amateur service within the band 5 250-5 450 kHz;
  2. to carry out sharing studies on the impact to other services currently allocated in the band referred to in invites ITU R 1 and in the adjacent bands;
  3. to complete studies in time for WRC 15.

IARU E-letter - zpráva z WRC 2012 č. 3

• 16. únor 2012

IARU E-LETTER
The International Amateur Radio Union IARU Electronic Newsletter
14 February 2012

In this Issue:

Special WRC Report Number Three The Amateur Radio Service Gains A Band Near 500 kHz

472-479 kHz. The worldwide amateur radio service has a new frequency band, 472 to 479 kHz. It is a secondary allocation. There are other services in that portion of the spectrum that must not be interfered with by the amateur operation.

The aeronautical radionavigation service is a primary service in the band 415-495 kHz in the following areas: Australia, China, the French overseas communities of Region 3, Korea (Rep. of), India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Japan, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea and Sri Lanka.

The aeronautical radionavigation service is a primary service in the band 435-495 kHz in the following areas: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, the Russian Federation, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan.

The amateurs are allowed to use the band so long as it does not cause interference to this primary service or the maritime mobile service operating in the 472-479 kHz band.

There are some countries that will not allow amateur radio operation in the 472-479 kHz band. The use of the frequency band 472-479 kHz in Algeria, Saudi Arabia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Belarus, China, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, United Arab Emirates, the Russian Federation, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Oman, Uzbekistan, Qatar, Syrian Arab Republic, Kyrgyzstan, Somalia, Sudan, Tunisia and Yemen is limited to the maritime mobile and aeronautical radionavigation services. The amateur service shall not be used in the above-mentioned countries in this frequency band, and this should be taken into account by the countries authorizing such use.

The ITU Radio Regulations provide that radio amateurs are limited to 1 watt (e.i.r.p.) however administrations whose territory is beyond 800 kilometers from the borders of the following countries may increase the operating power to 5 watts (e.i.r.p.): Algeria, Saudi Arabia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Belarus, China, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, United Arab Emirates, the Russian Federation, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Mauritania, Oman, Uzbekistan, Qatar, Syrian Arab Republic, Kyrgyzstan, Somalia, Sudan, Tunisia, Ukraine and Yemen.

The change becomes effective with the adoption of the Final Acts of the Conference. Of course, it will be determined by each administration around the world as to what modes and bandwidths will be used in this portion of the spectrum and when hams in that country will have access to the spectrum.

More activities from the WRC-12 will be reported at the end of the WRC. The WRC continues until 17 February. There is an effort underway to place an amateur radio agenda item on the agenda for the next WRC which will take place in 2015.

Distribution Of This E-Letter

This electronic newsletter is sent to many IARU member-societies headquarters around the world. Individual amateurs should encourage their IARU national society to forward the newsletter to its own members. The newsletter can also be read and downloaded from the IARU web site at www.iaru.org.

If you are an ARRL member, you can subscribe to this E-Letter directly on the ARRL web site. When you log into the ARRL web site, go to the page where you can edit your profile and choose the electronic newsletter options that are available.

If you have any information that would be appropriate to publish in this electronic newsletter, please contact me at "w6rod at iaru.org".

Rod Stafford W6ROD IARU Secretary

The IARU E-Letter is published on behalf of the Administrative Council of the International Amateur Radio Union by the IARU International Secretariat. Editor: Rod Stafford, W6ROD, IARU Secretary. Material from The IARU E-Letter may be republished or reproduced in whole or in part in any form without additional permission. Credit must be given to The IARU E-Letter and The International Amateur Radio Union.

IARU E-letter - zpráva z WRC 2012 č. 2

• 4. únor 2012

IARU E-LETTER
The International Amateur Radio Union

IARU Electronic Newsletter
February 2012

In this Issue:

Special WRC Report Number Two

The procedures used by the Int'l Telecommunication Union (ITU) before and during a World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC) seem complicated. They are somewhat complicated but they are understandable with a bit of background.

Each agenda item that will be decided at a WRC has been studied for at least 3 or 4 years leading up to a WRC. ITU Working Parties discuss the issues involved in the agenda item. Compatibility studies, sharing studies, experiments, etc. take place whenever needed so that discussions and decisions can be made based upon facts rather than opinions. Within a year prior to the start of a WRC an important meeting called the Conference Preparatory Meeting (CPM) occurs. The CPM report pulls together all of the information dealing with each of the agenda items and sets forth the various ways, if there is more than one, that an agenda item can be satisfied or decided. By the time of the CPM, most all of the arguments in favor of the agenda item and opposed to the agenda items have been thoroughly discussed in the many meetings that take place regarding each agenda item. When a national administration arrives at the WRC, decisions have generally been made by that administration whether to be in favor or opposed to any particular agenda items. However, it is usually not that clear cut. Some administrations may be in favor if certain adjustments or modifications are made to one or more of the proposed methods to satisfy the agenda item. In other words, discussions and negotiations really get started during the earlier stages of the WRC. For example, Administration X may withhold support or opposition on a specific proposal until other administrations agree to support Administration X's position on other agenda items that Administration X is very interested in.

At the beginning of the WRC, each agenda item is assigned to a Sub-Working Group (SWG) to allow interested administrations and other interested attendees the opportunity to discuss the agenda item. This is the stage where most of the negotiations and compromises are made in order to arrive at a consensus as to how to decide the agenda item. The preferred way is to have a consensus by the SWG attendees. Many times the consensus is achieved by all parties realizing that the result may very well turn out to be a situation where "everyone is a little bit unhappy."

The flow of the work is that the output of the SWG goes to the Working Group level. After the WG level deals with the issue it moves to the Committee level. By the time the issue gets to the Committee level, revisions to the work done at the lower levels is generally not done. Once the agenda item passes the Committee level, it goes to the Plenary for two readings. If it passes the two readings the agenda item appears in the Final Acts of the WRC.

There are also times when a consensus by ALL parties is just not possible. An agenda item can move from the SWG stage to the Working Group stage where most administrations have reached a consensus on how to resolve the issue but there are still some administrations that are in favor of No Change (NOC).

Agenda Item 1.23. In the case of agenda item 1.23, there was a good deal of support among administrations at the SWG level for a secondary allocation to amateur radio just below 500 kHz. However, there was strong resistance by several administrations to the allocation based upon a stated concern that amateur operation in that portion of the spectrum could cause interference to Non-Directional Beacons. SWG 4C3 (the SWG dealing with agenda item 1.23) met 12 times over a period of ten days trying to arrive at a consensus on 1.23. Finally, a consensus was achieved on the issue by adding various footnotes dealing with the allocation that satisfied most of the administrations opposing the allocation. At the end of the day, there were still a couple of administrations opposing the allocation. As a result, the SWG elevated the issue to the Working Group level with 2 options to satisfy the agenda item:

1.) a secondary allocation to the amateur service in the band 472-479 kHz with certain operating conditions set forth in footnotes to the allocation, or
2.) No Change (in other words, no amateur allocation).

The proposal that has been agreed to by most administrations that support the amateur allocation calls for a worldwide secondary allocation to the amateur service at 472 to 479 kHz with a power limit of 1 watt e.i.r.p., but with a provision for administrations to permit up to 5 watts e.i.r.p. for stations located more than 800 km from certain countries that wish to protect their aeronautical radionavigation service (non-directional beacons) from any possible interference. Proposed footnotes provide administrations with opportunities to opt out of the amateur allocation and/or to upgrade their aeronautical radionavigation service to primary if they wish to do so. In addition to these protections for aeronautical radionavigation, the amateur service must avoid harmful interference to the primary maritime mobile service.

At the Working Group meeting, there was no shifting of positions so the matter was elevated to the next level to Committee 4 with the same 2 options. The Committee 4 meeting takes place on Tuesday, 7 February. I will report on the results of that Committee 4 meeting but based upon the results thus far, I am cautiously optimistic that the amateurs will have a new secondary allocation at 472-479 kHz.

Agenda Item 1.15. Another agenda item being carefully watched by the IARU is agenda item 1.15 dealing with oceanographic radar. One of the candidate bands for the placement of oceanographic radar is 5.250 to 5.275 MHz. There have been a number of administrations that have granted amateurs access to spectrum around 5 MHz. In fact, one of the bands listed by IARU as a future allocation is 5 MHz. If oceanographic radar is operating in the 5.250-5.275 MHz band, that may impact the ability of the amateurs to obtain an allocation in that area. The candidate bands have not been finalized as yet at the WRC.

Distribution Of This E-Letter

This electronic newsletter is sent to many IARU member-societies headquarters around the world. Individual amateurs should encourage their IARU national society to forward the newsletter to its own members. The newsletter can also be read and downloaded from the IARU web site at www.iaru.org.

If you are an ARRL member, you can subscribe to this E-Letter directly on the ARRL web site. When you log into the ARRL web site, go to the page where you can edit your profile and choose the electronic newsletter options that are available.

If you have any information that would be appropriate to publish in this electronic newsletter, please contact me at "w6rod at iaru.org".

Rod Stafford W6ROD
IARU Secretary

The IARU E-Letter is published on behalf of the Administrative Council of the International Amateur Radio Union by the IARU International Secretariat. Editor: Rod Stafford, W6ROD, IARU Secretary. Material from The IARU E-Letter may be republished or reproduced in whole or in part in any form without additional permission. Credit must be given to The IARU E-Letter and The International Amateur Radio Union.

IARU E-letter - zpráva z WRC 2012

• 1. únor 2012

IARU E-LETTER
The International Amateur Radio Union

IARU Electronic Newsletter
January 2012

In this Issue:

Special WRC Report Number One

 

The International Telecommunication Union ("ITU") World Radiocommunication Conference 2012 (WRC-12) started 23 January 2012 in Geneva, Switzerland. This is the "big show" for spectrum allocation matters and a very important meeting if you are an amateur radio operator anywhere in the world. Every 4 or 5 years a WRC takes place. The last one was in 2007. Approximately 3,000 people will attend WRC-12. These are government officials, telecommunication industry people and others, like the IARU, who have an interest in the use of the radio spectrum. The agenda items discussed during WRC-12 were established at the previous WRC in 2007. In the past 4.5 years there have been many committee meetings within the ITU to try to arrive at solutions that will satisfy each of the agenda items. In the case of some of the agenda items, several possible methods to satisfy the agenda item have been identified. It is up to the WRC to select the most appropriate method to satisfy the agenda item, that is, to arrive at an worldwide solution to the issue presented in the agenda item.

There are a number of agenda items for WRC-12 that have some impact on amateur radio, immediately or sometime in the future. Each of the agenda items is assigned to a committee and also sub-working groups. Within each of these sub-working groups the agenda items are discussed in detail, the proposals from regional telecommunication organizations are analyzed, and the discussion proceeds toward developing a consensus on the agenda item. It seems to the casual observer to be a slow, tedious process but it works quite well in developing consensus, assuming the parties are at least a little bit flexible in their views.

AI 1.23. The agenda item that has been discussed widely within the amateur community over the last 5 years is agenda item AI 1.23. In 2007, the agenda item was stated as follows: "to consider an allocation of about 15 kHz in parts of the band 415-526.5 kHz to the amateur service on a secondary basis, taking into account the need to protect existing services." There are a number of suggested ways to satisfy this agenda item that are being discussed at the WRC: 1. A secondary allocation of up to 15 kHz to the ARS on a worldwide basis between 472 kHz and 487 kHz. 2. Two non-contiguous worldwide secondary allocations to the ARS at 461-469 kHz and 471-478 kHz, totalling 15 kHz. 3. A CEPT proposal for a worldwide secondary allocation of 8 KHz from 472 to 480 kHz. 4. No change.

It appears from the first several days of committee meetings that many of the member states attending the WRC are in favor of granting the amateur radio service an allocation but the details remain to be established. The member states that are in favor of No Change (NOC) have stated that they are primarily concerned with possible interference to Non Direction Beacons that currently operate in the spectrum under consideration. It is still early in the process to determine if the amateur service will succeed in gaining an allocation in this portion of the spectrum.

AI 1.10. This agenda item is as follows: "to examine the frequency allocation requirements with regard to operation of safety systems for ships and ports and associated regulatory provisions, in accordance with Resolution 357 (WRC-07)." This agenda item might have impacted the IARU goal of achieving a secondary allocation under AI 1.23. However, with the dropping of the AI 1.23 Method for an amateur allocation between 493 and 510 kHz, there should no longer be a conflict between maritime service objectives for AI 1.10 and amateur service objectives for AI 1.23.

AI 1.15. This agenda item is as follows: "to consider possible allocations in the range 3-50 MHz to the radiolocation service for oceanographic radar applications, taking into account the results of ITU-R studies, in accordance with Resolution 612 ." ITU committee meetings leading up to WRC-12 have identified the following bands to be studied under this Agenda Item:

3.5 - 5.5 MHz, 8 - 10 MHz, 12 - 14 MHz, 24 - 30 MHz, 39 - 45 MHz. These have been refined to particular candidate sub-bands including 5.060-5.450 MHz, 13.870-14.000 MHz, 24.000-24.890 MHz and 29.700-30.000 MHz. The IARU position is that oceanographic radar applications are incompatible with the amateur and amateur satellite services in the range 3 to 50 MHz and should not be allocated in bands already allocated to the amateur and amateur satellite service, including 5.250-5.450 MHz in which a growing number of administrations are providing for some access by amateurs on a domestic basis.

Footnotes. At each WRC, there is an agenda item that deals with footnotes contained within the Radio Regulations. Generally, this is a situation where an administration (a country) has "opted out" of the decision of a WRC and therefore creates an exception to the table of frequencies in the Radio Regulations. For example, a country may say that it will not use a certain service in a portion of the spectrum that has been designated for that service by the WRC. Therefore, a footnote is created in the Radio Regulations for that portion of the spectrum indicating a designated use is not available in that country even though it may be available in many other parts of the world. There are a number of examples of footnotes that relate to amateur radio. One of IARU's tasks during each WRC is to try to get administrations to remove their country's name from footnotes that prevent amateurs in that country from using spectrum that is available for amateur radio usage in other countries.

There are other agenda items which the IARU has determined to be a low threat to the amateur radio and the amateur-satellite services but those items will be closely watched by the IARU Team at the WRC-12 to make sure they do not negatively impact amateur radio.

WRC-12 started on Monday, 23 January and will conclude on Friday, 17 February. During this four week period, as the working groups and sub-working groups go through the agenda items I will report any significant developments in subsequent electronic newsletters.

Distribution Of This E-Letter

This electronic newsletter is sent to many IARU member-societies headquarters around the world. Individual amateurs should encourage their IARU national society to forward the newsletter to its own members. The newsletter can also be read and downloaded from the IARU web site at www.iaru.org.

If you are an ARRL member, you can subscribe to this E-Letter directly on the ARRL web site. When you log into the ARRL web site, go to the page where you can edit your profile and choose the electronic newsletter options that are available.

If you have any information that would be appropriate to publish in this electronic newsletter, please contact me at "w6rod at iaru.org."

Rod Stafford W6ROD
IARU Secretary

The IARU E-Letter is published on behalf of the Administrative Council of the International Amateur Radio Union by the IARU International Secretariat. Editor: Rod Stafford, W6ROD, IARU Secretary. Material from The IARU E-Letter may be republished or reproduced in whole or in part in any form without additional permission. Credit must be given to The IARU E-Letter and The International Amateur Radio Union.

Návrhy pro skupiny C3 a C4 na konferenci IARU Reg. 1

• 24. květen 2011

K dispozici jsou i materiály pro pracovní skupinu C4, která se zabývá otázkami KV, ke stažení zde. Organizačními záležitostmi se zabývá skupina C3 - podklady pro její jednání jsou zde. Připomínky k problematice KV i k návrhům pro skupinu C3 zasílejte na adresu "ok1ri at jimaz.cz".

Jirka, OK1RI

Návrhy pro skupinu C5 na konferenci IARU Reg. 1

• 19. květen 2011

ČRK obdržel dokumenty k projednání na konferenci IARU, která se koná v srpnu letošního roku. Dokumenty pro pracovní skupinu C5 (VKV) jsou zde volně ke stažení a prostudování. Veškeré připomínky k problematice VKV zasílejte na emailovou adresu OK2ZI ("ok2zi at atlas.cz"). Stanovisko ČRK ke všem materiálům bude zveřejněno na WEBu ČRK před konferencí.

Karel, OK2ZI

IARU E-LETTER

• 20. duben 2011

IARU Electronic Newsletter
April, 2011

In this Issue:
1. Conference Preparatory Meeting (CPM) Action on Agenda Item 1.23 (WRC-12)
2. A Primer on the IARU Structure

Conference Preparatory Meeting - February, 2011

Between every ITU World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC) there are two Conference Preparatory Meetings (CPM). The first CPM (CPM-1) usually takes place right after a WRC and at CPM-1 the work leading up to the next WRC is planned out. Then during the next few years, technical studies are conducted if necessary and many, many study group and working party meetings take place to determine how each of the items on the agenda for the next WRC can be resolved. The 2nd CPM (CPM-2) usually takes place within a year prior to the WRC and it is a very important meeting. It is important because it is the culmination of all the work from the various meetings, discussions, experiments, studies, etc. that have taken place since the CPM-1 and the output of CPM-2 for the most part forms the basis of the actions taken at the WRC on each of the agenda items. As with all important ITU meetings, IARU was present for the two-week CPM meeting to promote IARU objectives and goals.

One of the agenda items for WRC-12 (January-February, 2012) is very important to the amateur radio service worldwide. Agenda item 1.23 states:

"to consider an allocation of about 15 kHz in parts of the band 415-526.5 kHz to the amateur service on a secondary basis, taking into account the need to protect existing services"

The report of the CPM-2 contains 3 alternatives, or methods, of dealing with agenda item 1.23. The CPM report provides:

"After taking studies into account, the following methods to satisfy this agenda item have been proposed:

Method A
A secondary allocation of up to 15 kHz to the ARS on a worldwide basis between 472 kHz and 487 kHz.

Method B
Two non-contiguous worldwide secondary allocations to the ARS at 461-469 kHz and 471-478 kHz, totaling 15 kHz.

Method C
No change to the Radio Regulations."

So, at WRC-12, the gathered member states (the governments attending the WRC) will likely adopt one of the methods set out by the report of the CPM-2 to resolve, or satisfy, the agenda item.

IARU will be at WRC-12 and will be working for a favorable outcome for amateur radio operators worldwide.

IARU Structure

The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) is an organization consisting of over 160 national amateur radio societies around the world. The International Secretariat for the IARU from time to time receives inquiries from individual amateurs as to how they may join IARU. There are no individual members of the IARU. The best way to support the IARU is to maintain membership in one or more of the IARU national amateur radio societies.

The IARU is governed by the IARU Administrative Council (AC). The AC consists of the IARU President, Vice-President, Secretary and two representatives from each of the three IARU regional organizations. IARU Region 1 is Europe, Africa and the Middle East and parts of Asia. IARU Region 2 is North, South and Central America. IARU Region 3 is most of Asia and the Pacific. The Administrative Council determines the policy for the IARU. All of the members of the IARU AC are volunteers as are the officers and directors of the IARU regional organizations. The current President of the IARU is Tim Ellam VE6SH from Canada and the Vice President is Ole Garpestad LA2RR from Norway. The current regional representatives from the three IARU regions come from The Netherlands, Senegal, Venezuela, Mexico, Australia and Japan. The IARU is truly an international organization in both the scope of work and outlook.

As noted in the last issue of this E-Letter, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is the United Nations agency that deals with information and communication technologies. Included within the scope of the ITU work are communication services such as the amateur radio and the amateur-satellite services. The Radiocommunication Sector of the ITU (ITU-R) manages the international radio-frequency spectrum and satellite orbit resources. One of the most important activities of the IARU is to work within the ITU structure to preserve and maintain the spectrum allocated to the amateur radio and amateur-satellite services and to promote the usefulness and value of amateur radio. IARU attends all ITU-R meetings that may have any impact on amateur radio. In addition to being a sector member of ITU-R, the IARU also is a sector member of the Development Sector of ITU, or ITU-D. Emergency communications, disaster planning and response are topics discussed in ITU-D and IARU participates in those discussions. The nine individuals who are members of the IARU AC cannot attend all of the numerous ITU meetings that are important to amateur radio. There are quite a number of other qualified individuals, including IARU Expert Consultants and Technical Representatives, who volunteer their time and effort in attending meetings and participate in working groups or study groups on behalf of the IARU.

The IARU AC meets at least once per year but stays in almost daily contact between meetings by email. There are generally a number of IARU officials present at major amateur radio events around the world, such as the Dayton Hamvention or the DARC sponsored event in Friedrichshafen, Germany held in June each year.

In addition to the IARU work within the ITU, there are a number of other activities the IARU is involved in.

The IARU Monitoring System consists of a number of amateur radio operators around the world who monitor the amateur radio spectrum for intruders or non-amateur radio stations transmitting on the amateur radio frequencies. If an intruder is discovered then steps are taken to bring the intruder to the attention of the telecommunication authority where the intruder resides to have the signal removed from amateur radio bands.

The IARU Beacon Project maintains a series of radio beacons in various parts of the world so that amateur operators can determine propagation patterns and participate in propagation studies.

The IARU sponsors the yearly IARU HF World Championship contest. IARU member-societies and IARU volunteers are encouraged to join the contest to promote awareness of the IARU.

The Worked All Continents award is the oldest operating award in amateur radio. The basic award is earned by confirming contacts with the six continental areas of the world (contacts with Antarctica count for the nearest continent with a permanent population). Applications generally are submitted to an amateur's own national IARU member-society. For more information visit www.iaru.org/wac/.

The IARU sponsors World Amateur Radio Day each year in the spring. IARU member-societies are encouraged to take advantage of this special day to promote amateur radio in their country.

The IARU from time to time also becomes involved in other special projects related to amateur radio.

In a subsequent issue of this E-Letter, the IARU regional organizations will be discussed.

Distribution Of This E-Letter

This electronic newsletter is sent to many IARU member-societies headquarters around the world. Individual amateurs should encourage their IARU national society to forward the newsletter to its own members.

If you are an ARRL member, you can subscribe to this E-Letter directly on the ARRL web site. When you log into the ARRL web site, go to the page where you can edit your profile and edit the email subscriptions that are available.

If you have any information that would be appropriate to publish in this electronic newsletter, please contact me at "w6rod at iaru.org".

Rod Stafford W6ROD
IARU Secretary

The IARU E-Letter is published on behalf of the Administrative Council of the International Amateur Radio Union by the IARU International Secretariat. Editor: Rod Stafford, W6ROD, IARU Secretary.

Material from The IARU E-Letter may be republished or reproduced in whole or in part in any form without additional permission. Credit must be given to The IARU E-Letter and The International Amateur Radio Union.

Japonští radioamatéři obstarávají komunikaci po ničivém zemětřesení

• 18. březen 2011

After the 8.9 earthquake that struck near Sendai, Japan at 2:46 PM JST (0546 UTC) on Friday, March 11, the island nation is trying to recover. Soon after the earthquake -- which the US Geological Survey is calling the largest to hit the island nation in 140 years -- Japan has been rocked by tsunamis and power outages caused by trouble at a nuclear power station. Reports from Japan tell of phone and Internet service still up in most parts of the country. Even so, the Japan Amateur Radio League (JARL) -- that country's IARU Member-Society -- has asked that 7.030 MHz be kept clear for emergency use. Other reports are asking that these additional frequencies be kept clear: 3.525, 7.030, 7.077, 7.087, 7.097, 14.100, 21.200 and 28.200 MHz.

JA1RL, the JARL HQ station -- along with other amateurs throughout the island nation -- is maintaining the effort to support the disaster relief operation, according to IARU Region 3 Secretary Ken Yamamoto, JA1CJP. "In less damaged areas, the electric power supply is being restored gradually and local amateurs have started to establish stations at shelters," he said. Yamamoto said that JA1RL continues to operate as an emergency traffic center on 7.030 MHz, as well as 2 meters and 70 cm. It is receiving and reporting news from Japanese amateurs who are in the affected area. Using battery power or small generators, Japanese stations are active and are using various frequencies to exchange rescue and disaster relief operation information with JA1RL and others.

"While 3.525, 7.030, 7.043 and 7.075 MHz have been mentioned as in use, it's wise to keep those -- and all of the Center of Emergency frequencies -- clear of normal and non-urgent traffic," said IARU Region 3 Disaster Communications Committee Chairman Jim Linton, VK3PC, who added that there is no call for additional foreign radio amateurs in Japan.

For more on how radio amateurs in Japan are providing communications support after earthquake, click here. For information on how US amateurs are helping out, click here. For more on how Japan, Hawaii and the Western US dealt with the immediate aftereffects of the earthquake and tsunami, click here.

 

The ARRL Letter ze 17. března 2011

 

IARU E-LETTER

• 18. leden 2011

IARU E-LETTER
IARU Electronic Newsletter
January, 2011

In this Issue:

The ITU - International Telecommunication Union

ITU

If you were to ask most amateur radio operators what entity is responsible for granting privileges to use portions of the radio spectrum for amateur radio purposes the answer would likely be their own national telecommunication authority. However, that's only partially true. The ultimate authority for the use of the radio spectrum is the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). It is desirable that each amateur radio operator understand what the ITU is and why its work and decisions are important.

Most countries are Member States of the ITU and by way of treaty generally agree to be bound by the decisions of the ITU when it comes to the usage of the radio spectrum. Each country can decide that a certain use determined by the ITU may not apply in their own jurisdiction. It is not common for countries to do that but it is within their sovereign authority to do so.

The International Telecommunications Union is a United Nations agency that deals with information and communications technology issues. They have an extensive web site at www.itu.int that details much of their work. The ITU is based in Geneva, Switzerland and includes in its membership 192 Member States and more than 700 Sector Members and Associates.

ITU has coordinated the shared global use of the radio spectrum, promoted international cooperation in assigning satellite orbits, worked to improve telecommunication infrastructure in the developing world, established the worldwide standards that foster seamless interconnection of a vast range of communications systems and addressed other global concerns, such as mitigating climate change and strengthening cybersecurity.

The top staff official of the ITU is its Secretary-General, Dr. Hamadoun Toure who is also a licensed radio amateur with the call sign HB9EHT. There are three sectors in the ITU: Radio- communication (ITU-R), Development (ITU-D) and Standardization (ITU-T). The IARU is a Sector Member in both the ITU-R Sector and the ITU-D Sector. The IARU fully participates in both of those sectors by attending any and all meetings that involve issues that may impact the amateur or the amateur-satellite services. The Secretary-General, the Deputy Secretary-General and the Directors of the three ITU Sectors are elected to four-year terms by the Member States at Plenipotentiary Conferences held every four years. The IARU is a recognized international telecommunication organization and is invited to participate as an observer at the Plenipotentiary Conferences. The most recent "Plenipot" was held in October, 2011 in Guadalajara, Mexico.

The ITU Council was established in 1947 under the name Administrative Council, following a decision taken by the 1947 Plenipotentiary Conference in Atlantic City, New Jersey, United States. The Council comprises a maximum of 25% of the total number of Member States, which are elected by the Conference with due regard to the need for equitable distribution of Council seats among the five world regions (Americas, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australasia). The current Council is comprised of 48 members.

The role of Council is to consider, in the interval between Plenipotentiary Conferences, broad telecommunication policy issues to ensure that the Union's activities, policies and strategies fully respond to today's dynamic, rapidly changing telecommunications environment. It also prepares a report on the policy and strategic planning of the ITU. In addition, Council is responsible for ensuring the smooth day-to-day running of the Union, coordinating work programs, approving budgets and controlling finances and expenditures. Finally, Council also takes all steps to facilitate the implementation of the provisions of the ITU Constitution, the ITU Convention, the Administrative Regulations (International Telecommunications Regulations and Radio Regulations), the decisions of Plenipotentiary Conferences and, where appropriate, the decisions of other conferences and meetings of the Union. The IARU has attended several ITU Council meetings in the recent past.

The ITU-R Sector is very important for radiocommunication services, including the amateur and amateur-satellite services. Every 4 or 5 years the ITU holds a World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC) to revise the international Radio Regulations. It is the job of WRC to review, and, if necessary, revise the Radio Regulations, the international treaty governing the use of the radio-frequency spectrum and the geostationary-satellite and non-geostationary-satellite orbits. Revisions are made on the basis of an agenda determined by the ITU Council, which takes into account recommendations made by previous world radiocommunication conferences. The general scope of the agenda of world radiocommunication conferences is established four to six years in advance, with the final agenda set by the ITU Council two years before the conference, with the concurrence of a majority of Member States. The next WRC is scheduled for 23 January to 17 February 2012, just one year away.

Under the terms of the ITU Constitution, a WRC can:

  1. revise the Radio Regulations and any associated Frequency assignment and allotment Plans;
  2. address any radiocommunication matter of worldwide character;
  3. instruct the Radio Regulations Board and the Radiocommunication Bureau, and review their activities;
  4. determine Questions for study by the Radiocommunication Assembly and its Study Groups in preparation for future Radiocommunication Conferences.

There is a lengthy preparatory process for every WRC in which the IARU participates as a Sector Member. There are usually countless meetings dealing with each agenda item that has been determined to be on the agenda for a WRC. Many of those agenda items can, and do, have a substantial impact on the amateur radio usage of portions of the radio spectrum. It is important for the IARU to participate to "protect our frequencies" and when the opportunity presents itself, to expand our spectrum.

ITU-R Study Groups and Working Parties address each agenda item on the WRC agenda and try to arrive at a consensus and recommendation(s) how the agenda item may be addressed or dealt with at the WRC. Studies are conducted many times to determine how a proposed new usage may impact the other services, or not. Each of these agenda items are thoroughly discussed for at least a couple of years leading up to the WRC. You can imagine how important it is for the worldwide amateur community that IARU participate in the entire study group/working party process.

ITU-D is where much of the ITU's work on disaster response takes place. The development arm of the ITU considers emergency telecommunications an integral part of its projects integrating telecommunications/information and communication technology in disaster predication, detection, and alerting. Emergency Telecommunications play a critical role in the immediate aftermath of disasters by ensuring timely flow of vital information which is much needed by government agencies, and other humanitarian actors that are involved in rescue operations and providing medical assistance to the injured. IARU's task in the ITU-D Sector is to ensure that amateur radio's role in disaster communications is understood and appreciated by the ITU members. The ITU-D Sector also conducts a worldwide conference. The current schedule calls for a World Telecommunication Development Conference every 4 years. In 2010, the WTDC was held in Hyderabad, India in late May and early June. IARU participated in the conference.

The ITU also sponsors regional and global exhibitions called TELECOMS. An ITU Telecom offers a global ICT community platform that gathers stakeholders from across the telecommunications/ICT sector to connect, collaborate and create the future ICT landscape. Forums or seminars related to ICT are conducted at the Telecoms and IARU has participated in such forums, usually on topics related to emergency communications.

In one of the ITU buildings, there is a permanent amateur radio station, 4U1ITU. 4U1ITU is the club station of the International Amateur Radio Club.

In an upcoming IARU E-Letter, I will describe the organization of IARU and how it works within the ITU and the regional telecommunication organizations like CEPT, CITEL and APT to ensure amateur radio's continued place in the radio spectrum landscape.

73, Rod W6ROD

© OK1XU, 1999